One of the Most diverse Nations in the world

South Africa, The Place We call Home.

BaPedi

BaPedi

A seven-million strong people mostly residing in Limpopo and the North West Provinces of South Africa. The origins of Bapedi can be traced back more than 500 years ago when the Sotho people migrated south from the Great Lakes. Due to the Difaqane and later, the clashes with the Boer Voortrekkers, the migration was followed by generations of unrest among Pedi people. Traditionally Bapedi lived in round huts of clay and cow dung, roofed with grass. Spinach, samp, milk and maize their traditional choice of food which is specially cooked Pedi style is still a favorite to this day.

The Xhosa Culture

The Xhosa Culture

It is a descendant of the Nguni clan. The Xhosa speaking group has various tribes with similar or related but divergent heritages. The major tribes include Bomvana, Mpondomise, Thembu, Xesibe, and Mpondo. Besides, Mfengu and Bhaca have adopted the language of Xhosa. The word Xhosa is from a legendary leader known as uXhosa. Another theory claims that the word Xhosa is derived from san or khoi-khoi language.

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The word Xhosa means ‘angry’ or ‘fierce’, the Xhosa being the fierce group. The Xhosa refers to their language as isiXhosa and themselves as amaXhosa.
Setswana Culture

Setswana Culture

Now assumed to have arrived in south Eastern part of Botswana around ad 600 or 700 due to new archaeological evidence, pushing back what was originally thought was their estimated time of arrival in the area. It is believed that they then began to displace and or absorb the Khoisan clans who were already living in the area. By the year 1500 the major Tswana tribes started to form through a process of fission and amalgamation of agnatic groupings, spreading northward as well as westward from the then Transvaal in search of greener pastures, for the sake of farming and herding of their livestock.

Swazi Culture

Swazi Culture

Mostly residing on Swaziland and South Africa, it is the way of life and practiced customs by the Swazi people through various historical stages. Speakers of the Nguni SiSwati language, it is composed of various clans who have the language in common. Religion, food, architecture, music, kinship are among many cultural practices of this people. The traditional political structure of Swaziland is one of the most visible features of the Swazi people as a nation. Ngwenyama and Ndlovukati are recognised as the leaders on the nation. Ngwenyama as the King and Ndlouvukati as the spiritual leader.

The Zulu Culture

The Zulu Culture

Originally a major clan founded by Zulu kaMalandela in 1709 in what is today known as KawZulu-Natal, when quite a few large Nguni clans occupied the area. iZulu in the Nguni languages means heavens or weather. It is believed they arrived in South Africa at about the 9th century as part of the bantu migrations. Under the leadership of Shaka Zulu the most famous of their Kings, the Zulu tribe became a powerful state in 1818. While he was being mentored by Dingiswayo, he became his (Dingiswayo) leader while being the commander of the army of the Mthethwa Empire. Systematically uniting a confederation of tribes under his famous own Zulu Empire.

Venda

Venda

The Venda forebears established a great civilization in the valleys and mountains of Limpopo, centred around Mapungubwe. Venda which means, pleasant place, is what they named their place of settlement in modern day South Africa. They were one of the last African groups to migrate south of the Limpopo River. Interestingly, woman in the Venda culture are encouraged to occupy senior positions in society, which is unusual for cultural African people, especially since they are primarily rules by Kings.

Ndebele

Ndebele

Chief Mafana, the Ndebele’s first recognisable king is where the people’s history can be traced back to. In the 1600’s Mhlanga who is Mafana’s successor moved away from his cousins and settled in the hill of Gauteng near Pretoria our capital city. This settlement of people became known as the Ndebele people. The tribe was eventually split due to Mhlanga’s two sons fighting over the chieftainship of the people. They were split into the Ndzundza and the Manala moving to the South and North respectively, yet both remaining very much Ndebele.

XiTsonga

XiTsonga

Spread throughout Southern Africa, they are numbering in axcess of six million people. The Tsonga people consist of the Shangaan, Tonga, Thonga and other smaller groups. They can be found in Mozambique, Zimbabwe and South Africa, where they are largely concentrated in the Limpopo area, but can also be found in Mpumalnga and Northern KwaZulu-Natal in large numbers. Historically Tsonga people fished the eastern coastline,

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grew their crops and generally lived peaceful and insular lives before the 1800s. It is during the 1800s when many of the Tsonga people spread through Southern Africa to escape the growing might of the warring Zulu Kingdom.
BaSotho

BaSotho

In 1818, Moshoeshoe I consolidated various Basotho groupings and became their king. During Moshoeshoe’s reign (1823–1870), a series of wars (1856–68) were fought with the Boers who had settled in traditional Basotho lands. These wars resulted in the extensive loss of land, now known as the “Lost Territory. A treaty was signed with the Boers of Griqualand in 1843 and an agreement was made with the British in 1853 following a minor war. The disputes with the Boers over land, however,

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were revived in 1858 with Senekal’s War and again, more seriously, in 1865 with the Seqiti War. The Boers had a number of military successes, killing possibly 1,500 Basotho soldiers, and annexed an expanse of arable land which they were able to retain following a treaty at Thaba Bosiu